Survey Results: 1 out of 10 Women Feel Attactive

Troubling results from a recent study regarding the self-esteem of women in the United Kingdom.

Are You Attractive? 9 out of 10 Women Say NO

A UK survey explores the rules of attraction

 
A thousand women were recently surveyed on the topics of beauty and confidence. The Dove Body Confidence Census 2012, conducted in the UK among women aged 18 to 64, suggests that low self-esteem apparently runs quite high.

“If you ask a normal woman on the street how she describes herself — her looks, her body — the biggest response that comes back is that she feels average,” said a spokesperson for Dove in an interview with Female First. “Only 2 percent of women are saying, ‘I’m beautiful’ and only 1 in 10 are saying, ‘I feel attractive.’ That’s just not where we want to be.”

The survey contains telling insights, though you can’t quite call it a serious scientific study. It’s no mistake that the survey was conducted by Dove, the body-products company whose self-esteem campaign has been noted for challenging modern body-image norms — or at least the norms in advertising and the media. The models in Dove print and television ads would be dubbed “plus-sized” by the fashion industry, while the rest of us would call them “people-sized.” Much to their credit, Dove also has a social mission to inspire good role modeling for young people, and is partnered with kid-influencing organizations like the Girl Scouts and the Boys & Girls Clubs Of America. We won’t hold against Dove that it’s made by the same global corporation that produces Axe, whose commercials for male grooming products perpetuate the exact stereotypes Dove is trying to wash away. Unilever also makes Popsicles and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. But we digress.

Why the apparent lack of confidence among women? And are the results reliable, or might someone who’s genuinely beautiful inside and out have the grace not to say so? It seems like a no-brainer to blame low self image on media outlets at large, given all the bony butts on display in commercials, movies, and magazine covers. Yet the highest percentage of survey subjects — one in four — said the biggest pressure to be beautiful comes from within. “Society” was the second culprit. Only one in ten women blamed the media. A mere five percent felt pressure from friends, family, and partners.

“Being loved” was the greatest confidence booster of all, and half of all women said they feel more confident when they are complimented. Curiously, the number of compliments women delve out drops as women get older. Does that indicate that beauty gets deprioritized with maturity, or just that older women become less generous? The survey doesn’t say. But what does seem clear is that no matter how likely a woman may be to appreciate what she sees in the mirror, she just won’t believe her eyes till someone else tells her to.

Tell us on Facebook: Do you think you’re attractive?

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