10 Ways To Help Boost Your Child’s Intelligence

Access this link for details on the following 10 things that you can do to help boost your child’s intelligence:

1. Play Brain Games

2. Make Music

3. Breast Feed

4. Foster Fitness

5. Play Video Games

6. Junk the Junk Food

7. Nurture Curiosity

8. Read

9. Teach Confidence

10. Breakfast Breeds Champions

5th Graders Tour Mars

Convent of the Sacred Heart fifth graders are taking a virtual tour of Mars as they build a rover and design a system to land the rover on another planet.

NASA Project Gives Students Virtual Tour of Mars

By Sean Cavanagh on December 11, 2012 2:10 PM

The Curiosity, an SUV-size vehicle, is roving the surface of Mars, collecting information on soil, rocks, and other data that scientists hope will enhance their understanding of the red planet.

Soon, students from across the country will be roving, virtually, right along with it.

Beginning Wednesday, Dec. 12 at 1 p.m., Eastern time, a trio of organizations will be hosting a “virtual field trip” to Mars, which will give students and teachers detailed information on the rover’s mission and its work. The virtual program, titled “Journey to the Extreme: Your V.I.P. Pass to Mars,” also will be archived for schools’ future use, for those who miss the initial launch.

The program will include information presented by scientists and engineers who have worked on the rover project, including Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for education and an astronaut, and Dave Lavery, program executive for NASA’s solar system exploration and the Curiosity’s mission.
Mars_240.jpg

The project is a joint effort of the i.am.angel foundation, NASA, and Discovery Education. (The i.am.angel foundation was launched by will.i.am, a founding member of the musical group the Black Eyed Peas.) The virtual trip is part of an overall, five-year project called i.am.STEAM, meant to engage and inspire students through interactive projects to consider “STEAM”-related fields—or those focused on science, technology, engineering, the arts, and math.

The virtual program’s primary audience is students in grades 3-12, with a focus on middle school, Discovery officials say. While the event can be used in the classroom, they note that the archive will allow students, families, and other school officials to return to the resource after the event. Pre-virtual trip activities, which are aligned with academic standards, are available for download on http://www.iamsteam.com.

Photo of the surface of Mars courtesy of NASA.

Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education

From ted.com:

In 1999, Sugata Mitra and his colleagues dug a hole in a wall bordering an urban slum in New Delhi, installed an Internet-connected PC, and left it there (with a hidden camera filming the area). What they saw was kids from the slum playing around with the computer and in the process learning how to use it and how to go online, and then teaching each other.

In the following years they replicated the experiment in other parts of India, urban and rural, with similar results, challenging some of the key assumptions of formal education. The “Hole in the Wall” project demonstrates that, even in the absence of any direct input from a teacher, an environment that stimulates curiosity can cause learning through self-instruction and peer-shared knowledge. Mitra, who’s now a professor of educational technology at Newcastle University (UK), calls it “minimally invasive education.”

“Education-as-usual assumes that kids are empty vessels who need to be sat down in a room and filled with curricular content. Dr. Mitra’s experiments prove that wrong.”

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